Gamifying My Flipped Classroom

I have been doing reading on gamification and its impact in the classroom for a while. I have seen posts on Twitter and blogs from a variety of teachers who are making it work, but it just never seemed like it was a good fit for my classroom. How do you add games to Chemistry?!

I have been listening to Chris Aviles a lot recently and his system really seemed to make sense. Think of a typical role-playing game and you will see that the classroom isn’t much different. The student is the game’s main character with certain abilities. The people in your group are your guild that you compete with. The assessments are the Quests your character must go through and accomplish in order to “level up.” And the classroom is the world in which you are currently competing. When you look at it from this perspective, gamification of the classroom should be a piece of cake.

But here is the other problem my co-teacher and I were having with this idea when I presented it to her last year. Some kids just don’t like to play games. Whether that be an actual video game or the game of school, some just don’t have the personality or the abilities to compete. It would take the right combination of students with the right personalities and the right level of ambition/competitiveness to make this work.

And so entered my 6B class.

When we played Nomenclature Boggle a few weeks ago, this class was cut throat. They are yelling their scores to each other, racing to finish just one more word before the timer ran out, and did it all with smiles on their faces. Some of the students in the class had accrued more points in 2 rounds than one of the other classes did in 3. I knew that this class would be totally into a system that allowed them to compete against each other.

So here is how everything works (and this very much follows . The class still has all of the same assignments as it would have before: Tests, Quizzes, Labs, HW, Quarterly. The average a student has in each of these categories averages to give them their Experience Points (XP). The students can also earn Achievement Points (AP) for a variety of additional tasks, some earned by behavior in the class, some outside. For example, asking an Awesome Question earns 50 AP, wearing your school ID is 10 AP, getting your name on the morning announcements is 100 AP. AP combines with XP to form a student’s Level in the class. So, someone who is a C student when it comes to assessments can actual have a Character Level above someone who is an A student because of AP. I have published 5 of these AP Badge categories for the students and the remaining 10 I came up with are all hidden. Once any student in class achieves that Badge, I will then publish it for all to see. Why do I keep it hidden? I want the students to be themselves, not purposely do things just to earn points. Plus, as Chris mentions, it leaves me a way to reward something a student does without having to predict it in advance.

But, the real key to all of this is the spreadsheet that I got from Chris. Here is a screenshot of it.Gamification Leaderboard screenshot

This spreadsheet keeps track of all the points the students earn during the marking period from either XP or AP. I have hidden the names of the students so you can only see their Character Names and Guilds. But, the real genius of all this comes from the script that Chris and one of his students wrote to automate the entire process. Here is a shot of it:Gamification Points Site

This is a website created from the Leaderboard spreadsheet that allows me to check off any student (names were removed from screenshot), Guild, or even whole class, and assign AP to them. Only myself and my co-teacher can see this site so students never know the hidden Badges nor can they cheat and assign extra points themselves.

So, we are off on a new adventure in 6B (no pun intended). We are flipping, doing guided-inquiry, and now gamifying the classroom. From Day 1, I have told my students that this is a ‘Classroom in Beta’ and to expect crazy on any given day. Now let’s see how crazy this actually gets!

[The files created by Chris Aviles can be found at Chris’ Teachers Pay Teachers site. Please also reach out to him (@techedupteacher) for additional information and assistance in setting up your class]

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