Tag Archives: #flipclass

Making My First Lightboard

I have tried using If This Then That (IFTTT) several times before and it always seems to fail me. Below is an example of one of those times. I setup an IFTTT to post here when a certain hashtag is used on my Instagram. Apparently, it doesn’t post the picture, just the text, and only in Drafts. I finally found a few minutes to update the blog so here is something from the summer.

So excited to finally get the glass for my light board! Found someone offering a free glass top to a table and I repurposed some LED lights from Ikea. Now I need to build the frame and figure out how to keep it upright.

For those who have never seen this, basically it is a whiteboard where you replace the whiteboard with a piece of glass. A webcam is is setup opposite the teacher to record the lesson and the video is flipped 180° in a video editing software.

The purpose of this is to help teachers make more dynamic instructional videos for their classes. Hopefully this will also help others want to make the leap into Flipping their classes.

Here is a video that explains this more.
https://youtu.be/BQfMKDaamwA

#makered #SummerofMaking #makerdads #flipclass #flippedlearning #ifttt

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Experimenting With Hyperdocs in the Flipped Classroom

One of the reasons I love the Flipped Classroom is it allows me to constantly make modifications for the needs of my students. I have been doing some work with Hyperdocs and really wanted to jump into for the Gas Laws unit we are starting at the beginning the 4th MP. The benefit of a good Hyperdoc is it gives the students all of the links to files up front, but only gives them 1 link at the beginning. I have been using Assignment Charts to show the students everything they need for an entire unit. I insert links to all of my instructional videos on YouTube into the Assignment Chart, but still students have a hard time going back and forth between Google Classroom, Google Forms, and YouTube.

So, I decided to package everything for the unit a little differently this time. In the Gas Laws unit, there are a lot of little bits to remember which requires a lot of podcasts. I rerecorded all of the podcasts into 4-6 minute videos and inserted them into an organized Google Slide file. Here is a screenshot of one slide:Gas Laws Slide screenshot

Each part of the unit is grouped into slides like this. I used the PHeT simulation for Gas Properties to explain the concept in that section, then recorded examples of how to solve the problems in a series of additional videos. All of the videos now play directly inside the Google Slide, instead of opening a new window and shifting to YouTube, and the students can still see everything else in the file while watching the video. For students that are pretty Math-savvy, they may only watch the concept video and figure out what they need to do on the Self-Check Quiz on their own. Others may watch every video on the slide before they attempt the Self-Check.

I have not abandoned the Assignment Chart, however. Since my Flipped Classroom runs asynchronously, it is important to give students all due dates up front.Gas Laws Slide screenshot 2The important factor is everything is now fully organized. Previously, if a student couldn’t remember where he/she was in the Gas Laws playlist (that has 14 videos), he/she might watch several incorrect videos before finding the one he/she needed. Now, he/she can click the link to the assignment he/she wants to work on and it sends him/her directly to the slide with all of the podcasts. If he/she has watched a video, a small “WATCHED” appears in the corner from YouTube. The Self-Check Quiz, if completed, not only changes color when clicked, but is auto-graded using Flubaroo, and the student’s score along with the answer key is emailed immediately. Even the labs, which are posted as assignments in Google Classroom, are linked so the students can see in advance what they are going to be doing.

As always, I have no idea if this is going to work. The Flipped Classroom (and my very supportive administration) gives me the flexibility in my classroom to try out new techniques. At the end of the unit, I will survey my students to get their feedback on the new method and report back here how it went.

What does a typical #flipclass lesson look like?

“What does a typical flipped lesson look like?”

This is one of the most common questions I get asked when I talk to educators about the Flipped Classroom. The truth is there isn’t a “typical” lesson in my class. Every class has a general plan, but since each student is working toward an individual goal, each day is different. But, my classes on Monday went really well so I wanted to share what was happening along with some pictures to illustrate.

On Monday, we were finishing the work we were doing on Electron Configurations and starting the unit on Naming and Forming Compounds. I had a DO NOW on the screen asking students to write the electron configurations for Zn, Ba, and Rn. Since the lesson on EC was 4 days prior (one of the negatives of block schedule) most of the class was confused. I asked a student who felt he knew EC’s well to come up to explain it to the class and answer their questions.

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Now came the divide. The students who were still struggling and wanted more practice were given a few more elements to complete on the side whiteboards. Those who were ready to move on worked on the “Homework.” Homework is in quotes because I don’t assign outside of class HW other than to find Chemistry in the world around you. All homework is actually classwork, but it is called homework for the traditionally minded. As the students finished the HW, they gave it to me or my co-teacher to grade and provide feedback on the spot. If they did well, they moved onto the assignment posted in Google Classroom; if they didn’t they were given the opportunity to complete another. [Note: we use a modified mastery learning system in which students can complete up to 4 versions of any of our Quizzes, HW, Tests, or Projects. Some students do it just to add extra grades; some do it to offset low grades. No matter what all are more knowledgeable at the end.]

Now, the assignment posted in Google Classroom kicked off the next unit we were studying. There were 2 instructional videos to watch (both less than 5 min), a Self-Check Quiz in a Google Form (which was auto-graded by Flubaroo with the score and answer key emailed in return immediately), and practice problems to complete (yes, you can read that as a worksheet). The practice problems are necessary because we are at a point where drill and kill is a necessary technique to get students to truly understand what is happening.

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Now, this is why I can’t give you a traditional lesson. At this point in the block, I have 3 levels of students: those still working on the Electron Configuration HW because they needed that extra practice, those taking notes, and those working on the practice problems. That is 25 students spanning 2 different units. But, if a class didn’t have the faster learners, they might all have stayed together on the same topic for longer. I can’t predict that until we are actually in the middle of the lesson somewhere.

The Flipped Classroom isn’t a magic bullet and I don’t think that I am a good teacher just because I use it. What I do know is my students get a greater level of support from their teachers because of it. My faster learners no longer feel like they are being held back, the students who need more support get more attention from me and get more of their questions answered, and I get to talk to every student every day.

The beauty of the Flipped Classroom is that no 2 classes look exactly the same. My Flipped Classroom will and SHOULD look different from yours. You have different kids, a different school, and you are a different teacher. No matter what you do or how you do it, just remember to make the time that you spend with your students meaningful!

[Author’s Note]: this post was originally written at the beginning of October, but was never posted.

My first #flipclass #flashblog

There is a Flipped Classroom chat going on every Monday from 8-9pm EST using the hashtag #flipclass. Like most chats, there is a topic and moderators and I am usually so busy doing other things I forget about it and miss the entire conversation. But, anyway.

Something unique that they do is ask all participants to stop what they are doing at that moment in the chat and write a blog post on the spot discussing their ideas. Then you need to post it back to the chat so everyone can read. As usual, I missed the entire chat, but I tuned it for the topic of the #flashblog: How do you experience community outside of your classroom or school?

Now I get to do what I love the most: talk about my amazing students.

I am the building advisor for the town’s Relay for Life event. This is event is community, not school, based. We have hundreds of attendees, all from the surrounding areas, and only about half of those present are students. This year, my school’s teams raised over $20,000!! That brings our 3 year total to just a hair over $60,000! I am so proud of my students. Most of them stay up with me all night long. We walk the track for hours, participate in all sorts of events throughout the night, gossip, each ridiculous amounts of junk food, and have a great time. Here are some pictures from this year’s event.

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I love participating in this event. Not only does it raise money for an extremely worthy cause, it helps me build stronger relationships with my students.

PS: I have no idea why the photos formatted the way they did. I just inserted them and that’s how they came out.